What is an ‘OFFICER’ under the was act definition?

March 7, 2020
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Definition of an “Officer” under he Work Health and Safety Act has been expanded to: “An officer of a PCBU is a person, such as a director or senior manager, who makes or participates in the decision-making of the business or who has the capacity to significantly affect the business’s financial standing. Officers include all members of the board, as well as senior executives and potentially other senior managers who can influence the business”

What is the real financial impact of an accident or injury?

March 7, 2020
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The actual cost of an injury or accident is usually much higher than you think!
Most Companies do not use proper cost analysis techniques to identify loss as a result of workplace accidents and injuries.

We all know about the direct costs, i.e. those covered by insurance (workers comp, motor vehicle, property, equipment, fire etc.), however it is the undisclosed or uninsured costs that are often overlooked and hidden amongst normal operating costs.

These overlooked costs can be very high, often higher than the known direct costs. Sure the process of collecting the information is time consuming but it is the only way to accurately measure the cost of accidents and injuries to a Company.

Here are a few items to think about including into your cost analysis:

  • The costs of wages for time lost by people who are not injured (e.g. employees near the scene of the accident or who saw the accident)
  • Repair or replacement of property (e.g. machinery that is not insured, materials, work in progress)
  • Loss of production by the injured worker
  • Cost of supervisors time
  • Decreased output from the worker once they have returned to work
  • Uninsured medical costs (e.g. first aid supplies)
  • Cost of time to investigate accidents and incidents

Safe work australia releases information about stress costs

March 7, 2020
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Fascinating report released by Safe Work Australia today. “Mental Stress costs Aus businesses more than $10 billion per year” “More Professionals made claims for mental stress than other any other occupation with over a third of their claims made for Work pressure”. See the full report at the Safe Work Website.

Serial Leave Takers

March 7, 2020
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‘Serial leave takers’ are often one of the most challenging things for an employer to manage. Clause 10-2935 of the Fair Work Act “Additional provision relating to termination of employment” may be able to assist. It states that: “If an injury or illness is not ‘prescribed’ (see FWA definition) and (i) the employee’s absence extends for more than 3 months; or (ii) the total absences of the employee, within a 12 month period, have been more than 3 months (whether based on a single illness or injury or separate illnesses or injuries); and they are not on personal/carer’s leave” you could be able to terminate or at least start managing the behaviour based on attendance. Even if the employee has not hit that magic 3 month mark yet – we may still be able to prove attendance issues through patterns of behaviour and start managing them on it.

Why not give us a call so that we can investigate for you?

Why you shouldn’t lie about your previous salary

March 7, 2020
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You’ve applied for a job and managed to score an interview. When asked what you are currently earning or what you are expecting for the new role, you fudge the figures by adding a bit more to your “current” salary. Everyone hopes to get a earn more money with a new job but here’s why you shouldn’t lie about your previous salary:

1) There’s a high chance you will get caught. You don’t want to spend time worrying about whether someone will find out you told a fib when you should be focusing on the responsibilities of your new job. There has been a number of high-profile people who have lied about their previous salary, education or experience who were caught out years later when they were successful enough to draw attention to their background.

2) It’s hard to keep track of a lie. You could slip up to a co-worker or somebody could begin to get suspicious if they’re listening intently to anything you’ve mentioned about your previous experience and realise some things don’t quite add up. You don’t want to be Mike Ross from Suits and have a Louis Litt questioning everything you say.

3) Negotiating your salary is about your new role. Salary is not about work history but rather compensating you for the work you’re currently doing. Previous work experience is only one factor of negotiating the final figure.

Go into your interview with a salary range in mind for the current position and don’t be afraid of pointing out the differences between your current/previous responsibilities and the prospective responsibilities. Don’t sell yourself short but don’t lie to succeed.